Day 186 – round up

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Cows look so nice, grazing in their pasture or loafing around inside the barn.  The picture of bucolic country life.  Ahhh.

But Mr. Hyde typically emerges when you need to sort them for any reason.

Sorting cattle is stressful for the humans who are in with the herd, trying to get this one to go that way, and that one to go this way, and also for the cattle, who know something is up, but can’t quite figure out what to do besides mill around and froth.

But this time something happened.  Maybe it’s because we’ve been working with the herd more – not intentionally, but calves being sold here, a few steers to the butcher there.  Maybe it’s because the half-crazy cow left (to return as tasty hamburger in the freezer) and the herd calmed down.  Or maybe because we had fantastic help and/or didn’t try to rush the sorting process.  Whatever it was, the momma cows filed out with only a few cases of pushing and shoving, and the bull and the steers trotted into the pen easier than in a long time.  The younger calves were running around, but ended up running in the opposite direction of the bull & steers, so no one got penned up who shouldn’t have (let my husband tell you how much fun that is – trying to sort out a frantic calf from frantic steers, all with momma cow bellowing on the other side of the gate).

Saturday, the bull will be on his way to his “other home” for 6 months, and Monday, one steer has a date with the butcher.  We’ll turn the other two (a steer and a yearling bull) back out, then re-collect them in the fall for processing.  And do the process all over again.

Could “earthing” help us rebalance our charged modern lives?

I’m usually skeptical of the claims of most “naturalistic” cures for things, not because I don’t believe they can work, but because history demonstrates they’re no more of a panacea than modern medicine. Yet, there are some concepts that are so logical and contain such an element of historical veracity that I can’t help but […]

I’m usually skeptical of the claims of most “naturalistic” cures for things, not because I don’t believe they can work, but because history demonstrates they’re no more of a panacea than modern medicine. Yet, there are some concepts that are so logical and contain such an element of historical veracity that I can’t help but believe they’re true.

Food Renegade‘s recent article on the book Earthing: The Most Important Health Discovery Ever? rings with that kind of veracity for me, simply because it speaks to ways humans lived with a great deal of success for thousands of years before now. Basically put, we’re suffering as modern people because we don’t walk barefoot in the grass enough. Does that seem too simplistic? Read the article and see what you think.

DLH

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