Day 205 – looking like fall

IMG_0327There are a couple of things “wrong” with this picture:

1.  It’s before 8:00 am and the cows/horses are out in the pasture – they’ve been in the barn every morning for the last month or so, and

2.  This morning sky is not a summer morning sky.

We heard cicadas for the first time earlier this month, and it’s said that the frost is about 6 weeks away from that date, which would put our first frost around mid-August.  A lot of people pooh-pooh folk wisdom, but it’s been right too much for me to discount it all.  And I figure it got passed through the years for a reason – things that aren’t true don’t tend to be shared for very long after they’re proven wrong.

 

Day 165 – i see you, chicken

165Some of the hens really like this stand of tall grass next to our house – I’ve been getting 2-3 eggs here every day.  This Buff Orpington hen sits for awhile, goes to eat, walks around, comes back, sits for a little longer, maybe lays an eggs/maybe not, takes a walk, sits down again, and lays an egg if she didn’t before.  Then off she goes and another hen comes along to continue the process.

Not only the humans have routines on the farm – I’m amazed at how routine-driven the animals are. You can just about set your watch to which parts of the pasture (or which pasture) the cows are in during the day.  Recently (because the flies are getting to their summer levels) the cows are in the barn in the morning, work their way out to the back pasture and around it in the afternoon, then head to the front pasture in the evening.  They have their own timetable, which varies throughout the year, but if you pay attention over a few days, you can see the repetition.  The chickens are a little less predictable – they’re everywhere, all the time.  This nest in the grass may get “stale” in a few days, or it could go on for a few more weeks.  Then they move to another area, and I play “Easter egg hunt” once again in the afternoon.

 

Could “earthing” help us rebalance our charged modern lives?

I’m usually skeptical of the claims of most “naturalistic” cures for things, not because I don’t believe they can work, but because history demonstrates they’re no more of a panacea than modern medicine. Yet, there are some concepts that are so logical and contain such an element of historical veracity that I can’t help but […]

I’m usually skeptical of the claims of most “naturalistic” cures for things, not because I don’t believe they can work, but because history demonstrates they’re no more of a panacea than modern medicine. Yet, there are some concepts that are so logical and contain such an element of historical veracity that I can’t help but believe they’re true.

Food Renegade‘s recent article on the book Earthing: The Most Important Health Discovery Ever? rings with that kind of veracity for me, simply because it speaks to ways humans lived with a great deal of success for thousands of years before now. Basically put, we’re suffering as modern people because we don’t walk barefoot in the grass enough. Does that seem too simplistic? Read the article and see what you think.

DLH

Read more at my Farming blog...