Day 135 – surprise

Her previous owner thought she might be pregnant when we got her, but she never exhibited any signs of being pregnant, so we figured she wasn’t pregnant.

She was pregnant.

Meet Surprise, daughter of Pixie the Haflinger and one of the donkeys at her previous home.  We now have a mule at Innisfree on the Stillwater.

Day 88 – frosty cows

088It’s a chilly morning and there is a layer of frost on the ground – and on the cows who stayed outside last night.

Now before anyone starts with the “poor cold cows – you should put them in a barn every night”, we do have a barn for them to go into, and they do go in the barn when they feel the need.  If I’ve learned nothing else, I have learned that cows (and most animals) are smart enough to know when they need to get out of any weather.  When it rains, sometimes they come in, sometimes they don’t. Same with snow, ice, wind – any type of weather we have here.  And if you want to come and try to get them into the barn when they don’t want to?  Good luck!

Cows, horses, and goats also grow winter coats, so even though it looks like there’s not much hair, they are quite protected – the frost on the top of the cow means no heat is escaping from the cow.

The next time you drive by our farm and see critters with frost or some snow on their back, rest assured that there is shelter for them, they’ve chosen not to use that shelter, and they are doing just fine.

 

Day 71 – she looks harmless

006But watch out!  I was leaning over the feed bunker to look for eggs in one of the barn chicken nests, and she nipped me on the back!  Turns out that Minnie and her had something of a “game” where Minnie would stand on the railing and try to lick Pixie, who didn’t quite enjoy the game aspect and would nip at her.  So that translates into anyone coming over the railing gets nipped.

At least I know she didn’t bite me for no reason.  That would have ended badly for her.  But she’s been good since then, and I haven’t tried to lean over the railing with her nearby!

 

Day 65 – critter feed

2013-03-06 07.48.33In the winter, it’s slim pickings, food-wise, for the critters.  For the cows, horses and goats, their diet is hay.  The chickens forage for plant shoots and any bugs or worms that may be around.  To get them all a few more calories, we also feed them oats.

Feeding oats accomplishes several things.  It’s something the animals would eat anyway, so we’re not giving them they would have a hard time digesting (or can’t digest).  It also keeps them coming into the barn, which keeps them somewhat “tame” and used to the 2-legs being around.  That’s a good thing for the cows, especially when it’s calf banding and tagging time!  When they come into the barn, we can check them over, making sure there are no issues that we need to deal with and that they are all moving along well.

Come warm weather, we’ll stop feeding them oats and let them chow down on all the grass they can eat!

 

Day 26 – new horse

Welcome to the newest animal member at Innisfree Farm – Pixie.  She’s a 6 year old Haflinger (Rosie is also a Haflinger, and closer to 10 years old), and she even came with a harness!  She has been greenbroke(that means she’s done it before, but maybe isn’t completely used to doing it) to drive in […]

Rosie Pixie

Welcome to the newest animal member at Innisfree Farm – Pixie.  She’s a 6 year old Haflinger (Rosie is also a Haflinger, and closer to 10 years old), and she even came with a harness!  She has been greenbroke(that means she’s done it before, but maybe isn’t completely used to doing it) to drive in a harness, so that means she “should” be easy to train to pull logs, a sled, and other things around the farm.  This is exciting because Pixie (and Rosie, when we get her a harness) will take the place of using a tractor for some of the work we have.

Day 26 – new horse

Welcome to the newest animal member at Innisfree Farm – Pixie.  She’s a 6 year old Haflinger (Rosie is also a Haflinger, and closer to 10 years old), and she even came with a harness!  She has been greenbroke(that means she’s done it before, but maybe isn’t completely used to doing it) to drive in a harness, so that means she “should” be easy to train to pull logs, a sled, and other things around the farm.  This is exciting because Pixie (and Rosie, when we get her a harness) will take the place of using a tractor for some of the work we have.

Day 23 – the other side

This life isn’t for the faint of heart.  Tough decisions need to be made, when emotion can’t guide the outcome.  When it’s not about what you want, but what’s best for the person or animal. And sometimes those decisions hurt.   Ginny and Jenny – may your new pastures be sunny and warm, and may […]

This life isn’t for the faint of heart.  Tough decisions need to be made, when emotion can’t guide the outcome.  When it’s not about what you want, but what’s best for the person or animal. And sometimes those decisions hurt.
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Jenny

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Ginny

 

Ginny and Jenny – may your new pastures be sunny and warm, and may the grass be the greenest of all.

Day 23 – the other side

This life isn’t for the faint of heart.  Tough decisions need to be made, when emotion can’t guide the outcome.  When it’s not about what you want, but what’s best for the person or animal. And sometimes those decisions hurt.
20130123_164500
Jenny
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Ginny

 

Ginny and Jenny – may your new pastures be sunny and warm, and may the grass be the greenest of all.