Day 298 – Lucy update

Lucy is getting back to her “normal” self after her snip and chip appointment. She was happy to see me when I picked her up, then gave me that “what just happened to me?!” look.

She was pretty out of it for a couple days and the poor thing thought she was in trouble because we brought her inside (she’s been outside in a fenced-in area since we found her). It was just going to be too cold for her to stay out there with as thin as she is (she went from 50 to 52 pounds in about 2 weeks, but we can still see her ribs). A few pain pills, a lot of loving on her, and rest has greatly improved her outlook on life.

The inside life definitely agrees with her – she must keep tabs on her humans regularly, which is best accomplished by pacing around the house, then coming up and licking us. Plus she is much calmer inside. The cats are not sure about this (Trillian has taken to hiding in the cabinet under the bathroom sink), but so far, no major fights.

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Day 293 – getting big

They just keep growing – and eating – and growing! There are only a few of them that have “baby fur” on their heads. All the grown-up feathers are in and now we wait for them to be old enough to lay eggs. The breed characteristics from the hatchery say they mature “somewhat early” and have “very good” production. BackYard Chickens postings say 16-20 weeks until the first eggs (your mileage may vary, of course) – the chicks arrived September 5th, so (theoretically) we should (perhaps) be getting an egg or two in January(ish). Or maybe February.

I’ve been telling them that they are all above average, will be very good egg layers (they will be the best egg layers in the 937, in fact), and should think very hard about laying their first eggs as a Christmas present to me because they are such clever little birds.

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They appear to be thinking this over. I’m sure I’ll be receiving a list of demands in the near future.

 

Day 289 – the great chase

This is the correct positioning of a chain to keep a gate shut and critters in their appropriate places:

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This is not.

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When this happens,

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these

and this

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go on adventures.

This

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gets her head stuck in the gate and goes nowhere.

 

These

eat this,

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and are easily rounded up (bribery with oats), and this

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runs here.

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This

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is about 1/2 mile long from the the grass to the river (heading west – left in the picture).  Which equals 1 mile down and back. And when you (meaning me) is chasing this

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through half-grown beans planted in wheat stubble, that’s a very long, wet, tiring way.

After a mighty chase, and a very ugly tackle (yes, I tackled the dog. She’s fine.), this

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was reunited in with these

and this

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(who managed to get her head out of the gate at some point in time – I was 1/2+ mile away, remember?)

And this

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was double checked before leaving the area.

A-L-W-A-Y-S check the chains.

THE END.

 

Day 288 – happy puppy

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Our newest canine, Lucy, is settling in just fine. She’s been to the vet for her shots (another trip in the near future for the “snip and chip” procedures) and has put on some weight – she now weighs around 50 pounds. She loves to fetch her toy when I throw it, usually returns with it, sometimes drops it for me to throw again, and occasionally runs right past where I threw it and waits for me to get it for her. I bought her this Kong to fill with goodies and hopefully keep her occupied – she gets really bored and starts whine/yip/barking at everyone.

She’s learning “sit” and “stay” (with bits of cheese as reward – that gets her attention), and is learning that when she doesn’t pull while on the leash, she can breathe much better. And it appears that she may have been a house dog at one point, because she is very well behaved inside.

Dare I say it – she may be calming down just a little bit!

Day 285 – oh boy, a puppy!

We just keep on keepin’ on – the second cutting of hay is baled and will be moved to its storage area in the next few days. The goats have finished their work in the garden, and now it’s the chickens’ turn to scratch out all the weed seeds and finish off what the goats […]

We just keep on keepin’ on – the second cutting of hay is baled and will be moved to its storage area in the next few days. The goats have finished their work in the garden, and now it’s the chickens’ turn to scratch out all the weed seeds and finish off what the goats didn’t eat – next will be a layer of manure, then green manure seed to break up any manure or dirt chunks.

Molly being Molly...
Molly being Molly…

 

Hen at work, rooster watching the perimeter
Hen at work, rooster watching the perimeter

The Barred Rock hens are looking less like chicks and more like hens. Looking forward to their eggs – some of our older hens have slowed way down, plus with the days getting shorter, that drops their production.

We have a, sigh, new addition to the Innisfree family – Lucy. She was found at the bridge on 718 and by as skinny as she was, she had been on her own for a while. We think she had been running around in the cornfield because the Goldens were none too pleased to see her. Plus she sounds like a coyote – she has a dog bark, but also yips and trills like coyotes do. That hasn’t gained her much affection from them, either, but they’re getting used to her. Minnie not happy about this arrangement and has been somewhat pouting.

Here’s our new beastie:

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That last picture pretty much sums her up – she’s a spaz. Friendly as anything, but she gets wound up, and that’s the end of it – tearing in circles, yip/barking (which gets the rest of the dogs wound up), and generally being insane.

Also visited some friends of ours at End of the Road Farm in Fletcher – Lee has a horse powered sorghum press and organized a sorghum harvest open house. I don’t actually have a picture of the sorghum press because my focus was on the horse and harness since one of my goals is to get our Haflinger (Pixie) back under harness to do some work around the farm. Here’s a picture that gets some of the press in:

2013-10-05 14.26.50The horse pulls the end of that log around in a circle, which moves the wheels in the press, and when you feed in the canes, the juice is squeezed out and runs into a bucket. Strain it, put it in a big pan with a fire underneath, and let the juice cook down (very similar to the process for maple syrup) to sorghum. And she’s not angry – her ears are back because Lee is behind and off to the side of her telling her to get moving again and she’s listening to him.

 

 

Day 285 – oh boy, a puppy!

We just keep on keepin’ on – the second cutting of hay is baled and will be moved to its storage area in the next few days. The goats have finished their work in the garden, and now it’s the chickens’ turn to scratch out all the weed seeds and finish off what the goats didn’t eat – next will be a layer of manure, then green manure seed to break up any manure or dirt chunks.

Molly being Molly...
Molly being Molly…

 

Hen at work, rooster watching the perimeter
Hen at work, rooster watching the perimeter

The Barred Rock hens are looking less like chicks and more like hens. Looking forward to their eggs – some of our older hens have slowed way down, plus with the days getting shorter, that drops their production.

We have a, sigh, new addition to the Innisfree family – Lucy. She was found at the bridge on 718 and by as skinny as she was, she had been on her own for a while. We think she had been running around in the cornfield because the Goldens were none too pleased to see her. Plus she sounds like a coyote – she has a dog bark, but also yips and trills like coyotes do. That hasn’t gained her much affection from them, either, but they’re getting used to her. Minnie not happy about this arrangement and has been somewhat pouting.

Here’s our new beastie:

That last picture pretty much sums her up – she’s a spaz. Friendly as anything, but she gets wound up, and that’s the end of it – tearing in circles, yip/barking (which gets the rest of the dogs wound up), and generally being insane.

Also visited some friends of ours at End of the Road Farm in Fletcher – Lee has a horse powered sorghum press and organized a sorghum harvest open house. I don’t actually have a picture of the sorghum press because my focus was on the horse and harness since one of my goals is to get our Haflinger (Pixie) back under harness to do some work around the farm. Here’s a picture that gets some of the press in:

2013-10-05 14.26.50The horse pulls the end of that log around in a circle, which moves the wheels in the press, and when you feed in the canes, the juice is squeezed out and runs into a bucket. Strain it, put it in a big pan with a fire underneath, and let the juice cook down (very similar to the process for maple syrup) to sorghum. And she’s not angry – her ears are back because Lee is behind and off to the side of her telling her to get moving again and she’s listening to him.