Tool finder

Somebody needs to invent a system that allows people like me to find the tools I constantly misplace on the farm. No, really. We have 185 acres. Even if I limit myself to the area of our farm buildings, we’re … Continue reading

Somebody needs to invent a system that allows people like me to find the tools I constantly misplace on the farm. No, really.

We have 185 acres. Even if I limit myself to the area of our farm buildings, we’re talking 5 to 7 acres. It’s really, really easy to lose tools, even big tools, by simply putting them down and forgetting where they got put.

For example, I spent most of my day before writing this post looking for my lost Sawzall. One would think a red tool the size of a large ham would be easy to find. Not so, as it turns out, when one has to search through at least three different buildings and half a dozen projects in various states of completion.

So, what I need is a system that would somehow catalog where all my tools are in some kind of a central database. Even if it just covered buildings, such a system would cover 90 percent of my tools. And, if it had a way for me to wander around the farm and find tools I left elsewhere, that would be swell too.

DLH

Day 115 – things I found

115Living on a farm can be a daily treasure hunt – people have been dropping things around here since the 1800s, and even before, counting the arrowheads I’ve found.

Found this treasure yesterday in the cow pasture, out by the red barn.  I think it’s off an old planter that was parked out there, then later sold.  It’s Allis-Chalmers orange – not something easy to miss. But it was buried enough – you can see the dividing line between above ground and below ground.

It’s hard to know where to look – up, around, down – because you will always see something interesting.

Day 113 – other things we do

113Besides the chickens and beef cattle, we also roast coffees.  This is our set-up at the Market on the Miami in Troy.  Our current line-up is coffee, pottery, photo notecards from our friend Niki, local made jams and jellies from another friend, and information about our farm.

 

Taking the plunge!

While my wife and I have been living and working on Innisfree for the last three and a half years, it has always been something of a part-time job until now. Late last year, we paid off the last of … Continue reading

While my wife and I have been living and working on Innisfree for the last three and a half years, it has always been something of a part-time job until now. Late last year, we paid off the last of our outstanding debt and as a result, we have decided to have both of us working on the farm as our primary occupation.

While this may sound idyllic, the fact is that it is a leap of faith and a huge risk. Even in the best of circumstances, farming is not a high paying occupation, and the cost of living modern life is higher than most people realize. Nevertheless, it is a risk we are willing and able to take.

Here’s to hoping and to the future!

DLH

Day 112 – freckles

112Went to a book signing this evening to support a colleague and friend.  The lady on the left is R.A. Estes (we work together at Bradford), and she wrote, and illustrated, a book about her daughter (the lady on the right) and her freckles.

The book is called “Freckles” and you can buy it here, or let me know – I might even be able to get you a signed copy!

Local isn’t just about food!